About this blog

This blog is about the history of the Koo-Wee-Rup Swamp and neighbouring areas, such as Pakenham, Cranbourne and Garfield, and any other historical subjects I feel like writing about. It's my own original research and writing and if you live in the area you may have read some of the stories before in the Koo-Wee-Rup Swamp Historical Society newsletter or the Koo-Wee-Rup township newsletter, The Blackfish, or the Garfield township newsletter, The Spectator.
Heather Arnold.

Thursday, January 17, 2019

What happened in Garfield in 1910

I wrote this in 2010 for the Garfield Spectator, I have done one for every year and they are still an interesting snap shot of the town, 100 years on.

One of my favourite sources of historical information is The Argus newspaper. You can search The Argus and many other Australian newspapers on the Trove website. An absolute wealth of information can be found on this website and even though The Argus was a Melbourne newspaper, it had a lot of country coverage.

Here are some of the events which happened in Garfield, one hundred years ago, in 1910, as reported in The Argus.

On March 26, there was a report of a fire in a stack of wheaten hay belonging to Mr J.J. O’Leary. The fire was started by his son who was playing at burning off. The stack contained 50 to 60 tons of hay and was totally destroyed and uninsured.

In April 4, there was an account of an outbreak of typhoid fever amongst the men employed on the railway line. The Shire of Berwick Health Officer, Dr Keogh, said that due to the fact that these men had no sanitary conveniences, the only wonder was that there was not a much greater outbreak of fever.

The Argus March 1, 2010

If you are a racing fan there are lots of accounts of the Garfield Horse races, both advertising the races and the race results, such as the one above.

The Argus also had many stories about local residents, so if you have an interest in family history then you may find information about your own ancestors.  For instance, on May 24, there was a report headed Broken leg at 80 and it went on to tell us that Mrs McNab, who was visiting her son, was retiring for the night, when she fell and broke her leg in two places, the sufferer was attended by Dr Withington, who ordered her removal to Melbourne.

An article in September 5 reported on the funeral of Mrs R. Leeson, who for many years conducted the old Pig & Whistle Inn at Cannibal Creek, near Garfield. The deceased who had resided in the same house for over 50 years, was 100 years old.

The Argus November 29, 1910

Finally my favourite report for 1910 is this one from November 29. Obviously no-one worried about privacy issues in 1910! If you have an interest in local history or family history, then The Argus is well worth a look.

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